Integrated, Balanced and Always Expanding…

From Fred Krawchuk, Retired U.S. Special Forces Colonel and RAND Consultant:

“As a former college athlete and longtime leader of high-performance military units, I recommend Reggie Marra’s work with unbridled enthusiasm. Whether you are a student-athlete, parent or coach, this book’s proven practices will greatly enhance your performance in and enjoyment of youth, interscholastic and intercollegiate sports. Reggie’s savvy discussion of integrated training, competent coaching, and the importance of a proper training environment helps the reader clearly visualize a successful path of development. Following this comprehensive approach to training will not only produce better athletes, but also happier and healthier citizens as our youth grow and take their place in the world. I hope for the sake of student-athletes everywhere that this book gets the appreciation it deserves. How much happier we would all be if we could travel a healthy path of development supported by quality practices, competent and caring coaches/teachers, and a nurturing learning environment.”

From The Quality of Effort, and The Quality of Effort Workbook, Chapter 5, “The Varying Natures of Success and Justice”:

“Not everyone gets to be a professional, or even a collegiate or high school athlete, or a movie star, recording artist, reality show contestant, or some other locally, nationally or globally famous celebrity. When we have the courage to work toward our ultimate dream with a high quality of effort and we fall short, we really do need something to catch us. The love and support of family and friends are indispensable, but the safest net is within each of us—a truly integrated, balanced, and always expanding view of the world. The ability to recognize, appreciate and embrace serendipitous events and people can be a strong component of such a worldview.

“Sometimes we don’t get what we truly (think we) want and we get lots of what we don’t (think we) want. Just as often some very worthwhile, unexpected things come our way; we can enrich our lives by learning to recognize them and accept the good they bring.”

Copyright © 2013 by Reggie Marra

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Why Am I Doing This?

From The Quality of Effort, Chapter 10Motivation: Why Am I Doing This?

“In the broadest sense, whether we look at species development over thousands of years, or individual development from birth through infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood, humans can develop from having no conscious sense of an individual self, to worldviews that can be described as self- or ego-centered, then ethno- or group-centered, then world-centered, and then universe- or everything-centered. We might abbreviate these stages of development, respectively, as “huh?” “me,” “us,” “all of us,” and “all there is.” Put in other words, we can develop from not yet having a sense of identity, to just identifying with our individual self (common), to identifying with a group or groups such as family, school, team, religion, nation, etc. (very common) to truly identifying with all the people on the planet (rare), to identifying with everything there is (very rare). It’s important to note here that anyone who reads this book can understand the concepts of me, us, all of us and all there is. To take just one example, however, understanding what “world-centered” means is very different from truly orienting or living every day from a world-centered perspective.”

Copyright © 2013 by Reggie Marra

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